03-MARCH 26-2021

Love Tax Jokes!Good morning.
Investing isn’t just about valuations and how a company is performing.  It also involves second-level thinking, particularly about how others think about the market.  That can lead to some counter-intuitive observations.  For instance, bad news is typically good news for stocks.  Why?  Bad news increases the likelihood of further monetary and fiscal stimulus.  While that may be dangerous in the long-term, the market tends not to think that far ahead.
Case in point?  The latest jobless claims.  Reaching a pandemic low, and well below expectations, the market took a steep dive in early trading on Thursday.  With policies still in place to prop up the economy however, stocks were able to claw their way back to breakeven by early afternoon.

Have you observed any counter-intuitive situations like this when investing?

Hit reply and share your stories.

Now here’s the rest of the news:

How to Waste More Than a Trillion Dollars –Robert P O’Quinn, National Review
Never has such a massive policy as the president’s ‘stimulus’ package come at a time that is more inconsistent with economic reason. [Read Here]

March 26, 2020

I say we stopGood morning.  Wow!
That took awhile.  For the first time since February 12, 2020 the S&P 500 posted two consecutive up days.  While it looked like it was in jeopardy going into the close following stimulus hang-ups, it was able to complete the first step to its healing process.

All our hearts go out to those grieving or ill due to this terrible virus, and to those Canadians who have been laid off work or whose businesses have been forced to close.
These continue to be very challenging times.  We’re all doing our very best to adjust and keep our families healthy & safe.  Only a few weeks ago, the world was normal: We could move around freely and safely.  Now, we need to keep our social distance and worry for our loved ones and the welfare of all Canadians.

March 26, 2019

Arguments Help Innovation, Decision-Making

It is common knowledge that Orville and Wilbur Wright battled doubt, lack of money and gravity on their way to aviation history at Kitty Hawk, N.C.  What is not widely known is that they succeeded precisely because they challenged each other.

I was struck by an article in “Bits & Pieces” about how the Wright brothers argued every decision ferociously — so much so that acquaintances wondered how they could keep working together.

I read an article about how couples should fight for their relationship, not to win the argument.  I think it also applies to the workforce.  Every relationship, no matter how happy, suffers its share of conflict and argument.  If it’s going to endure, both parties need to know how to fight fair.  Follow these rules for arguments:

  • Address issues promptly.  Don’t let resentments simmer.  If something bothers you, bring it up within a reasonable amount of time (48 hours or so).
  • Treat each other with respect.  Refrain from name-calling, accusations and absolutes like “You always” and “You never.”  Keep your voices calm and make an effort to really listen to the other person’s point of view.  Or as South African cleric Desmond Tutu put it, “Don’t raise your voice, improve your argument.”
  • Keep it private.  Don’t argue in front of others.  lf necessary, make an appointment to discuss the issue.
  • Don’t let it drag on.  Try to set a time limit for resolving the issue.  Most arguments shouldn’t last more than 15 minutes.

So the next time you find yourself in an argument or debate, treat your opponents the “Wright” way.  Treat them like family.  Harvey Mackay’s Moral:

“Great minds don’t always think alike.”  

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Come From Aways, Do You?

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